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  • Linux on ARMThe Cotton Candy is a USB stick sized compute device allows users a single, secure point of access to all personal cloud services and apps through their favorite operating system, while delivering a consistent experience on any screen. The device will serve as a companion to smartphones, tablets, and notebook PC and Macs, as well add smart capabilities to existing displays, TVs, set top boxes and other media that supports USB mass storage.

  • Linux on ARMQEMU emulates a full computer system, including a processor and various peripherals. It can be used to provide virtual hosting of several virtual computers on a single computer. QEMU can boot many guest operating systems, including Linux, Solaris, Microsoft Windows, DOS, and BSD; it supports emulating several hardware platforms, including x86, x86-64 (AMD64/Intel 64), ARM, Alpha, ETRAX CRIS, MIPS, MicroBlaze, PowerPC and SPARC.

  • Linux on ARMThe Linaro Team is pleased to announce the release of Linaro 11.09, the Linaro's fourth release delivered on a monthly cadence. This release includes components delivered by all Linaro Teams: Working Groups, Landing Teams and Platform Teams. As usual, it brings a lot of updates and new features, integrated on top of Android and Ubuntu.

  • Linux on ARMWhile Hewlett-Packard recently announced they will be killing off their webOS devices, just days prior to that I had ordered an HP TouchPad 16GB to carry out some additional ARM-based Linux benchmarks. Although HP's devices may be going away, I am still fond of webOS and it's a fair environment to carry out performance tests.

  • Linux on ARMLinaro has released a new version of its Linaro open source Linux tools, kernel, and middleware stack for ARM Cortex-based consumer electronics. Based on the Linux 3.0.3 kernel and GCC 4.6 toolchain, Linaro 11.08 offers Android and Ubuntu images for the BeagleBoard-xM, Pandaboard, Snowball, and Samsung Origen development boards, plus a new build for the Freescale i.MX53 board.

  • Linux on ARMLast week it was reported that Linus Torvalds described the ARM SoC (System on Chip) ecosystem as a "Hodgepodge, " with the article then going on to imply that the diversity and innovation in how an ARM SoC is implemented makes it very difficult to implement Linux on ARM. I have a slightly different take on it.

  • Linux on ARMThis article describes how to get Android running on your favourite ARM-based System on Chip (SoC) board. We run through the overall procedure and point out potential pitfalls and other things that you may encounter.


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Linux on ARM