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  • Linux on ARMOpenNI has shown some lights to natural interactions by using depth map images together with RGB images from cameras. Natural human gestures, e.g. hand moving, limbs movements are all being developed fast. Microsoft Kinect is a typical example that demonstrated the huge potential of the OpenNI in terms of game applications.

  • Linux on ARM2011 was a remarkable year for technology. The rise of Android helped spread the adoption of smartphones; the iPad continued to dominate the tablet space, amid rumblings that we were entering a new post-PC era; and the cost of devices continued to fall, with Amazon launching its Kindle Fire tablet in the US for $199, and India seeing the launch of an Android tablet for just $35.

  • Linux on ARMWe've added a new installation guide for the Gumstix Overo family of devices. These tiny devices are even capable of running Chromium, XFCE, Qt, and a lot more. The Gumstix Overo is a tiny but powerful Computer-On-Module (COM) that performs like a full-sized Linux computer and can be programmed to perform a wide variety of functions in almost any application area including power management, time & attendance, security, access control, information technology, location tracking, medical, aviation, robotics and education, to name a few.

  • Linux on ARMIt might not exactly be quite as small as the idea originally intended, but the Raspberry Pi will probably make jaws drop regardless. The idea used to be for a flash drive-sized computer, but the concept has since evolved, somewhat grown in size, but not by much.

  • Linux on ARMEarly this year we got to see, through ARM-powered devices such as the Motorola Atrix, that it doesn't take even a netbook to run basic computing functions. At a live demonstration in New York City, FXI Technologies showed off the next evolution of that idea: an ARM-based computer on a USB stick without any of that extra smartphone or tablet baggage.

  • Linux on ARMFXI Technologies announced a USB stick-sized computer that can run Android or Ubuntu on a 1.2GHz ARM Cortex-A9 processor. The "Cotton Candy" will include 1GB of RAM, a microSD slot, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and an HDMI port, the company says.

  • Linux on ARMThe Cotton Candy is a USB stick sized compute device allows users a single, secure point of access to all personal cloud services and apps through their favorite operating system, while delivering a consistent experience on any screen. The device will serve as a companion to smartphones, tablets, and notebook PC and Macs, as well add smart capabilities to existing displays, TVs, set top boxes and other media that supports USB mass storage.

  • Linux on ARMIt's no secret that ARM-based SoCs are advancing at an incredible rate compared to x86 CPUs.  While ARM ratchets up the performance on the high end with multi-core architectures like the Cortex A9 and Cortex A15, which rivals and in many cases exceed the performance on low-power x86 chips, licensees such as TI have created full-featured SoCs at single-digit prices, enabling new low-power devices at tiny price points.

  • Linux on ARMEarlier this year British games pioneer David Braben surprised many people with the first appearance of the Raspberry Pi, a low-cost, open source computer aimed at children that he was helping to develop.

  • Linux on ARMThe Raspberry Pi is a $25/$35 computer based on a Broadcom ARM chip. The Fedora ARM secondary architecture project has ported the Fedora Linux distribution to ARM-based devices. Faculty and students at Seneca College involved with the Fedora ARM project are configuring and optimizing it to work with the Raspberry Pi.

  • Linux on ARMThe RaspberryPi Foundation, which aims to put computers in front of children for £15, has taken delivery of 50 engineering prototypes, and intends to get the final version to customers by the end of the year. Based in Cambridge and founded by six high-tech high-flyers, the foundation’s aim is to cure the programmer shortage by inspiring people to take up computing in childhood - as Sinclair Spectrums and BBC Micros once did.


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Linux on ARM