tablet

  • Linux on ARMAfter spending the better part of the past week running continuous open-source Linux benchmarks on the Exynos5-powered Google Nexus 10, the first extensive benchmark results for the Nexus 10 tablet running the Ubuntu Touch Developer Preview are now available. This performance comparison from Ubuntu on the dual-core ARM Cortex-A15 powered device is compared to numerous other ARMv7 and x86 devices.

  • Linux on ARMTests are running full-speed this weekend on benchmarking the performance of the brand new Ubuntu Touch/Tablet Developer Preview with the Google Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 devices. Here's a preview with some initial findings from performance testing these mobile ARM devices using Ubuntu Linux.

  • Linux on ARMCanonical has released tools for installing a developer preview version of Ubuntu 13.04 Touch on the latest Google Nexus phones and tablet.
     

  • Linux on ARMUbuntu is already one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems for notebook and desktop computers. Canonical is also working on a smartphone operating system called Ubuntu Phone OS. And now Ubuntu is coming to tablets.

  • Linux on ARMPengPod is now shipping its first tablets to customers. These are 7 and 10 inch tablets that can run both Google Android and Linux. When you first turn on a PengPod 700 or PengPod 1000 tablet, it will boot into Google Android 4.0, but there's also an 8GB microSD card in the box which has a Linux-based operating system on it. Just pop the microSD card into the tablet and reboot it and you'll have a Linux tablet.

  • Linux on ARMTablets wore off their novelty allure years ago, but there are still some ways to make them stand out, both among all other consumer electronics devices and amidst their peers. DaVinci Mobile just used one of those methods.

  • Linux on ARMEver since Microsoft officially released the Surface RT tablet on October 26, Linux experts have tried to find a way to deploy their favorite operating system on the new device. But the Redmond-based technology giant has managed to make it nearly impossible to deploy Linux on a Surface, Linux firmware developer Matthew Garrett admits.

  • Linux on ARMIf you were hoping you would be able to run your favorite Linux distribution on Microsoft's new Surface Tablet, it doesn't look like it will be an easy task to accomplish. After going through the state of Linux distributions handling SecureBoot, UEFI-guru Matthew Garrett confirmed via his blog that Linux on the Microsoft Surface is likely a lemon.

  • Linux on ARMRunning Linux on Android is an old favorite. With newer and older projects ranging from full installations to the less involved chroot method, users on a large range of devices can run Linux. The only limits are what distros of Linux you can load. Mostly, it is Ubuntu or other Debian-based distros. Now, ASUS Transformer TF300T owners can install Arch.

  • Linux on ARMThe PengPod tablet, which allows for dual-booting Google's Android and Ubuntu/Linaro on an ARM-based tablet, is becoming a reality after it was successfully crowd-funded.
     

  • Linux on ARMPengPod plans to start shipping 7 and 10 inch tablets with support for Linux as well as Google Android in January. The company, founded by Neal Peacock, has been raising money to help support software development for the tablets -- and Peacock just wrote in to let us know the project has surpassed its initial $49,000 fundraising goal.

  • Linux on ARMHow to work with SAP on cheap 7’’ $100 Chinese Android tablet? With the ability to boot linux from SD card without any change of existing firmware settings? In this case, you are not limited to simple mobile applications but the tablet becomes an almost full replacement of the x86 notebook including support for applications such as SAPGUI for Java.

  • Linux on ARMThere are plenty of tablet based on AllWinner A10 and A13 processors, but all of them run Android, and you are out of luck if  you want to run Linux on your tablet, unless you hack this yourself. But this is about to change as PengPod will launch 2 tablets and 1 mini PC running Linux from NAND flash or micro SD card:

  • Linux on ARMAnother 6 months, another Ubuntu Developer Summit event for Canonical, where Mark Shuttleworth is always present and keeps his audience captivated. Yes, we're talking about the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) event for the upcoming Ubuntu 13.04 (Raring Ringtail) operating system, which takes place these days, between October 29th and November 1st, in Copenhagen, Denmark.

  • Linux on ARMThe Nexus 7 tablet may be Google's flagship Android tablet. But it has a bootloader that can be unlocked, a powerful 1.2 GHz NVIDIA Tegra 3 quad-core processor, and 1GB of RAM. In other words, it should be perfectly capable of running other operating systems.

  • Linux on ARMUbuntu firmware has been made available for the SmartQ T20 tablet by its manufacturer, Smart Devices.The Android-toting T20 ships with Android 4.0.4 pre-installed by default, but users can choose to flash Ubuntu 12.04 on to their devices by downloading the newly released firmware.

  • Linux on ARMThere was plenty of excitement earlier this year over the news that a fully open tablet was in the works, and late last week some new revelations were made about the device that are sure to step up the anticipation even more.

  • Linux on ARMArch Linux ARM is a distribution of Linux for ARM computers. We are aimed at ARMv5 platforms like plug computers, OXNAS-based ARMv6 PogoPlugs, Cortex-A8 platforms such as the BeagleBoard, and Cortex-A9 and Tegra platforms like the PandaBoard and TrimSlice. However, it can run on any device that supports ARMv5te or ARMv7 instruction sets. Our collaboration with Arch Linux brings users the best platform, newest packages, and installation support.

  • Linux on ARMArchos may not have released Android 4.0 for its Gen8 line of tablets from 2010. But that doesn’t mean you can’t run an up-to-date operating system on the Archos 43 or Archos 101 Gen8.

  • Linux on ARMA group of developers at KDE have been working to offer a tablet with free and open source software based on the KDE Plasma Active user interface. Up until recently that tablet was called the “Spark,” but developer Aaron Seigo says that trademark issues have prompted the group to choose another name.


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Linux on ARM