ubuntu

  • Linux on ARMPicUntu is a custom version of Ubuntu Linux designed to run on TV boxes and other devices with Rockchip’s ARM-based processors. Now it’s easier to install than ever, offering a way to turn a cheap Android TV box into a full-fledged Linux computer.

  • Linux on ARMHave an Android tablet or TV box with a Rockchip RK3188 processor, and wish it ran a desktop operating system rather than a mobile OS? A new build of PicUntu is available, bringing the full Ubuntu Linux experience to devices with RK3188 processors.

  • Linux on ARMBack in late 2010, Google announced a "Chromebook"—a low-cost, entry-level netbook that would run Google's own operating system, ChromeOS. Google's vision of ChromeOS, although based on Linux, basically would be a giant Web browser, with all the apps on the machine running in the browser. ChromeOS would be a nearly stateless computer, with all the user's apps based in Google's cloud, running the Google Apps suite.

  • Linux on ARMCommercial Linux distributor Canonical is jumping out ahead of the pack again, and has updated its Landscape management tool for its Ubuntu Server distribution so it can manage instances of Linux running on ARM-based systems as well as the X86 iron it already supports.

  • Linux on ARMThe folks who brought us the PengPod line of 7 and 10 inch tablets which can run Android, Ubuntu, or other Linux-based operating systems are back, and this time they want to offer an iPad-sized tablet with a high-resolution display and a quad-core processor.

  • Linux on ARMThe Cubieboard brings SATA connectivity to a very low price point ARM Single Board Computer (SBC). The board has an ARM A8, 1Gb of RAM, 4Gb of Flash storage, HDMI output, and a whole bunch of IO pins. A recent update, the Cubieboard2 is now out, which replaces the Allwinner A10 CPU from the original Cubieboard (single A8 core) with a dual core Allwinner A20 (two A7 ARM cores).

  • Linux on ARMIt looks like it may be time to stop calling tiny ARM-based devices like the MK802 Android TV sticks and go back to calling them mini PCs. Rikomagic UK has announced it will start shipping Linux Editions of two of its most recent ARM-powered stick-sized computers.

  • Linux on ARMWant to build a so-called “supercomputer,” but don’t want to spend a ridiculous amount of money? No problem. Now there’s an option that costs just $99. Sort of.

  • Linux on ARMCompulab plans to launch a mini-computer with an ARM Cortex-A9 processor and support for both Ubuntu Linux and Google Android. It’s called the Utilite, and the computer’s expected to go on sale in August for $99 and up.

  • Linux on ARMAfter the release of the RK3188 Linux kernel source code last week, Ian Morrison (Linuxium) has managed to boot Ubuntu 12.04 with XFCE desktop on Tronsmart T428. However, as Tronsmart refused to release their source code, further Linux development is likely to happen on Rikomagic MK802 IV, because Rikomagic released the code for their device, so development work will be easier.

  • Linux on ARMRockchip’s RK3188 processor is one of the fastest ARM Cortex-A9 chips around. The 28nm quad-core processor outperforms the chips found in the Samsung Galaxy S III and Google Nexus 7, for instance. And it’s a relatively inexpensive chip, which explains why it’s proven popular with Chinese tablet and TV box makers.

  • Linux on ARMOn May 28, Canonical announced that several vulnerabilities had been found in the Linux kernel packages, affecting the OMAP4 kernel of the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system.

  • Linux on ARMThanks to individuals developers, we’ve been able to get Linux distributions based on Ubuntu, or Debian run on HDMI TV dongles for about a year, but nearly all of them just come with Android and that’s it.

  • Linux on ARMOn May 1, Canonical announced that several vulnerabilities had been found in the Linux kernel packages, affecting the OMAP4 kernel of the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system.

  • Linux on ARMOn April 8, Canonical announced that several vulnerabilities had been found in the Linux kernel packages, affecting the OMAP4 kernel of the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system.

  • Linux on ARMLast week's article discussed some of the broad differences between the ODroid-U2 machine and other ARM offerings. While ARM CPUs offer wonderful computing power per watt, in this article we'll dig into just how fast the ODroid-U2 can perform various tasks. I'll throw in some benchmarks from large desktop machines so you can get an idea of whether the ODroid-U2 might be fast enough to perform your given workload.

  • Linux on ARMSteve McIntyre and the Linaro Enterprise Group recently analyzed Ubuntu and Fedora software packages to see what software was still relying upon hand-written Assembly code. This was done to see how much real Assembly is being used, to see what the code was used for, and whether it was worth porting to 64-bit ARM / AArch64 / ARMv8.

  • Linux on ARMIan MORRISON (linuxium) has tested Linux with several mini PCs powered by different processors. The main point of his tests was to evaluate the performance difference between running Ubuntu 12.04 natively, or in a chroot in Android using tools such as Complete Linux Installer. I previously tried Linux on Android in ODROID-X, and found the applications start time when running from an low-end SD card pretty dismal, and the graphics performance poor.

  • Linux on ARMAbout 2 weeks ago, Jasbir released an Ubuntu 11.10 image and installation instructions for GK802 and Hi802mini PCs based on Freescale i.MX6. I could only find time to give it try yesterday and today. I'll provide the steps I followed to install the image, and my quick first impressions of the stability and performance of this image.

  • Linux on ARMAnnounced at NVIDIA's GPU Technology Conference (GTC) 2013 event today was the "Kayla" ARM development board.
     


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Linux on ARM