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  • Linux on ARMThe ARM-powered Raspberry Pi computers have a been a godsend to tinkerers, students, HTPC enthusiasts, and more. The inexpensive devices have proven quite useful for many projects, and continue to push the envelope on what can be achieved for little money. The $5 Raspberry Pi Zero, while very limited, is quite the feat of engineering.

  • Linux on ARMAMD Roadmap showed “Seattle” Cortex A57 server SoC were expected in H2 2014, which later became known as Opteron A1100, and the company unveiled their Optron A1100 development board in summer 2014, but since then there has been a few delays, the announcement of Huskyboard 96Boards EE development board, and finally they announced availability of three Opteron A1100 processors yesterday.

  • Linux on ARMFor those interested in small, low-power ARM single-board computers, up for your viewing pleasure today are benchmarks of several different boards from the Raspberry Pi Zero to the Banana Pi M2.

  • Linux on ARMAdlink unveiled a “Smart Touch Computer” family offered in three sizes, and with Intel or ARM CPUs, two touch options, and Linux or Windows embedded OSes.

  • Linux on ARMWith Raspberry Pi Zero, Next Thing C.H.I.P, and Orange Pi One, we now have have three ARM Linux development boards selling (now or soon) for less than $10 excluding shipping and taxes. So I’d think it would be interesting to compare the features of the boards, and prices for different use cases.

  • Linux on ARMAfter starting to run some Raspberry Pi Zero benchmarks this weekend, I'm back today with more benchmarks. In this article is also an interesting comparison showing the performance of the Raspberry Pi Zero and Raspberry Pi 2 against old "Northwood" Pentium 4 and Celeron processors from the Socket 478 NetBurst days. The many results in this article also include power consumption and performance-per-Watt metrics for this $5 ARM single board computer.

  • Linux on ARMFor those curious about the performance of the $5 Raspberry Pi Zero, here are some benchmarks I've just finished up for this low-end, low-power ARM development board compared to other ARM, MIPS, and x86 hardware.

  • Linux on ARMNVIDIA's Tegra X1 64-bit ARM SoC running (non-Android) Linux is a beast! I was given access to a SHIELD Android TV that was configured to run Ubuntu Linux, which has led for some exciting benchmarks. In some workloads, the Tegra X1 comes up just shy of an Intel Core i3 "Broadwell" system. The Tegra X1 has me very excited about the future of ARMv8 hardware on Linux and NVIDIA's continued Tegra advancements.

  • Linux on ARMEver since Raspberry Pi was introduced to the world, the consumer market for inexpensive, pocket-size mini computers has been growing rapidly. The huge popularity of these tiny computers in the mainstream stems from a variety of DIY projects powered by these affordable hardware, as well as many readily available open-source software packages.

  • Linux on ARMIntel's aiming to bring big core performance and intelligence in a microserver form factor with its new Xeon D family of processors, the company's first ever Xeon-based System-on-Chip (SoC). That sound you hear may be ARM's pulse skipping a beat, as Intel jams a mighty intimidating wrench into the rival chip maker's plans to dominate the microserver market.

  • Linux on ARMMost ARM mini PCs run Android, while mini PCs based on Intel Atom Z3735F currently all ship with Windows 8.1, so it makes comparison difficult. But since Linuxium posted triple boot instructions (Ubuntu, Android, Windows 10) for MeegoPad T01, he’s also run Antutu 5.6 on the platform, so we’ve got a comparison point.

  • Linux on ARMIn this video, AppliedMicro’s Kumar Sankaran discusses the software of the X-Gene platform and provides a comparison of X-Gene 1 and 2 against the latest Intel server processors Xeon E5.

  • Linux on ARMWith all these Intel Atom Z3735F been released right now at a price similar to ARM based mini PCs, many people, including myself, are wondering about the performance of the low cost Intel processor against their ARM competitors.

  • Linux on ARMSome people can't believe that Microsoft is working on a version of Windows Server for ARM processors. I only wonder what took the software giant so long.

  • Linux on ARMA group of researcher at CERN have evaluated Applied Micro X-Gene 1 64-bit ARM XC-1 development board against Intel Xeon E5-2650 and Xeon Phi SE10/7120 systems, and one of them, David Abdurachmanov, presented their findings at ACAT’ 14 conference (Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques) by listing some of the issues they had to port their software to 64-bit ARM, and performance efficiency of the three systems for data processing of High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments like those at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where performance-per-watt is important, as computing systems may scale to several hundred thousands cores.

  • how-toIt is a pity that smartphones and tablets did not come along earlier and did not need 64-bit processing and memory addressing sooner than they did. Had these consumer devices (which are now generally thought of as being indispensable for business as well) required such rich circuitry earlier, then the collective of chip manufacturers who are part of the ARM collective might have put some server-class chips into the field a lot earlier and given datacenters some real alternatives to the X86 architecture by now.

  • Linux on ARMThis weekend when publishing preview benchmarks of NVIDIA's Tegra K1 from the Jetson TK1 development board, there were numerous requests by Phoronix readers to see this high-end ARM SoC pitted against the new AMD AM1 APUs. In this article are some benchmarks of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on all of the AM1 Athlon and Sempron APUs compared to the Tegra K1 Cortex-A15 SoC.

  • Linux on ARMThe BeagleBone Black has been one of the popular low-cost ARM development boards in recent months for budget-minded hobbyists due to its $45 price-tag, being Linux friendly, and support for powering off a USB cable. While it may be a cheap ARM development board, is its performance too dauntingly slow?

  • Linux on ARMYesterday I delivered some interesting results showing Freescale's i.MX6 quad-core ARM SoC outperforming one of the original Intel Atom SOCs, with both devices being from low-powered Linux-friendly CompuLab PCs.

  • Linux on ARMFor the past few weeks I've had the pleasure of playing with CompuLab's Utilite Computer. The Utilite is a miniature ARM desktop computer powered by Freescale's i.MX6 SoC and is running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. This is a speedy little Linux system that for some workloads can blow past Intel's original Atom Z530 "Poulsbo" SoC system.


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Linux on ARM