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  • Linux on ARMIntel x86 or x64 processors have traditionally been found in laptops and desktops, while ARM processors have been found in lower-power embedded devices, smartphones, and tablets. But you can now buy laptops with ARM chips and smartphones with Intel chips.

  • Linux on ARMIf you want a quad core development board for less than $100, you only have two choices right now: Radxa Rock powered by Rockchip RK3188, and Hardkernel ODROID-U3 powered by Samsung Exynos 4412 prime.

  • Linux on ARMFedora has been supporting ARM architecture for a while now, but it was only as a secondary architecture without official support. With the recent Fedora 20 release, nicknamed “Heisenbug”, the ARM architecture, more exactly ARMv7 hard float and greater, is promoted to a primary architecture meaning ARMv7 will have the same status as x86 and x86_64 architectures with packages officially build and supported by the Fedora community.

  • Linux on ARMThe ODROID-XU is the latest exciting ARM development board. Rather than aiming for low-cost like the Raspberry Pi, the ODROID-XU currently offers maximum performance when it comes to open ARM development boards.

  • Linux on ARMIan MORRISON (linuxium) has tested Linux with several mini PCs powered by different processors. The main point of his tests was to evaluate the performance difference between running Ubuntu 12.04 natively, or in a chroot in Android using tools such as Complete Linux Installer. I previously tried Linux on Android in ODROID-X, and found the applications start time when running from an low-end SD card pretty dismal, and the graphics performance poor.

  • Linux on ARMIn the server space Intel is undisputedly king, with its chips inside more than nine in 10 servers shipped. But as the microserver market grows, so does the potential area of opportunity for UK chip designer ARM, which hopes to exploit its expertise in creating low-power chips for mobile devices.

  • Linux on ARMFedora 18 was officially released this week for x86/x86_64, but the ARM version of Fedora 18 "Spherical Cow" is still under development. Fedora 18 for ARM went into beta last week and since then benchmarks were carried out comparing Spherical Cow on ARM to other popular ARM Linux distributions.

  • Linux on ARMFor kicking off a new week of Linux benchmarking at Phoronix is a round of ARMv7 performance benchmarks using Linaro 12.12. The Linaro 12.12 release from December was compared to Ubuntu 12.10, Linaro 12.10, Fedora 17, and Arch Linux on the PandaBoard ES with its Texas Instruments OMAP4460 Cortex-A9 SoC.

  • Linux on ARMIf I didn't have to man El Reg's systems desk for a paycheck and had a little venture capital to blow, I might start a company called Leg Systems, headquartered on the Isle of Man– not because of its tax haven status (which is eroding), but because my company would sell ARM-based systems and say that we wouldn't charge an arm and a leg for them.

  • Linux on ARMSince publishing LLVM/Clang 3.2 benchmarks a few days ago that showed the Clang C/C++ compiler competing with -- and in some cases outperforming -- the GCC compiler on Intel x86_64, several Phoronix readers have been asking how things compare on the ARM side.

  • Linux on ARMOver the past several weeks of running the Samsung Chromebook with its Exynos 5 Dual SoC that is comprised of an ARM Cortex-A15 dual-core processor, I've grown quite fond of this latest ARM processor.

  • Linux on ARMLast week I shared some early benchmarks of the Samsung Chromebook while running Ubuntu Linux. The Samsung Chromebook is very interesting since it's one of the few readily available computers on the market employing an ARM Cortex-A15 processor rather than Cortex-A9 or other models.

  • Linux on ARMThe latest ARM Linux benchmarks to share at Phoronix is a comparison of Ubuntu 12.10, Linaro 12.10, Fedora 17, and Arch Linux when running from the dual-core Cortex-A9 OMAP4460-based PandaBoard ES development board.

  • Linux on ARMLast week I began delivering benchmarks of the low-power yet massively scalable Calxeda EnergyCore ECX-1000 ARM Server and followed the initial tests with some ARM compiler benchmarks and other benchmarks from this 5-Watt Linux Server.

  • Linux on ARMUsing the Fedora ARM remix on the raspberry Pi, I couldn't help but noticing how slow it was. I thought it was due to the Pi's weak hardware, but since I accidentally corrupted my root filesystem on the Pi, I decided to try Raspbian for  a change.

  • Linux on ARMIt's not even Friday yet, but there's more awkward entertainment today at the expense of Linux kernel trolls. The latest in the series of weird messages hitting the Linux kernel mailing list is a proposal to drop support for all CPU architectures but ARM and a new "invisible" file-system feature.

  • Linux on ARMThe latest Linux ARM benchmarks at Phoronix are comparing the performance of Gentoo Linux against Linaro 12.08 from a 1.4GHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A9 development board.
     

  • Linux on ARMHere's the latest benchmarks of the low-cost ODROID-X, a $129 quad-core ARM Cortex-A9 development board out of Korea with ARM Mali 400 graphics. For just $129 USD, the ODROID-X development board is very interesting with packing Samsung's quad-core Exynos 4412 ARM Cortex-A9 processors running at 1.4GHz per core, Mali-400 MP Core graphics, six USB 2.0 ports, 10/100 Ethernet, and support for running Android and/or Ubuntu/Linaro.

  • Linux on ARMHere's some interesting test results recently uploaded to OpenBenchmarking.org that compares the performance of ARM Cortex A8 and Cortex A9 cores running at 1.0GHz against an Intel Atom N450. All three systems running at 1.0GHz were also running Gentoo Linux. Clock-for-clock, can the latest-generation ARM Cortex-A9 take out the Intel Atom? For the most part, yes.

  • Linux on ARMHere are some more benchmarks of the ODROID-X, a $129 ARMv7 development board that packs four Cortex-A9 cores along with Mali-400 graphics to provide a fairly impressive punch. There's even some comparative numbers to a Sony PlayStation 3 running Linux.


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Linux on ARM